Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Social Sciences & Interdisciplinary Studies London, UK.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Social Sciences 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Donna Lybecker photo
Biography:

Donna L Lybecker is a Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Political Science Department at Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho, USA.  Her research and teaching cover the areas of Environmental Politics and International Relations, with emphasis on water policy, political narrative, and border studies.  Current research includes work on ecosystem services, focusing on the political and ecological linkages between the environment and people, including health related elements; public and stakeholders’ values, perceptions, and uses of resources; and the effects of policy narrative on perception and policy development surrounding international borders.  With her research, Dr. Lybecker aims to improve decision-maker and public understanding of human-environmental connections and contribute to better-informed conservation.  Recent publications include articles in Environmental Politics, International Journal of Sustainable Society and Politics and Policy.

Abstract:

Policy analysts in the United States, and many democracies, are taught they are not advocates for, but rather trustees of the public interest.  However, policy analysts often lack political communication skills in how they present science-based information such as environment and health issues, finding their data ignored or manipulated by others.  Using environmental issues in the United States, this paper suggests understanding both the values behind policy prescriptions and the values of constituents can help policy analysts educate the public without engaging in manipulating the public.

statistical evidences

Stakeholders’ Communication choices

References:

Lybecker D, McBeth M, Brewer A, De Sy C. (2017: Forthcoming) The Social Construction of a Border:  The US-Canada Border.  Journal of Borderlands Studies. 

McBeth M, Lybecker, D, Stoutenborough, J, Running K, Davis S (2017: In Press) Content Matters: Stakeholder Assessment of River Stories or River Science. Public Policy and Administration. (DOI:  10.1177/0952076716671034)

Lybecker D, McBeth M, Stoutenborough J (2016) Do We Understand What the Public Hears?  Stakeholders’ Preferred Communication Choices for Discussing River Issues with the Public. Review of Policy Research 33, 4:  376-392.

Lybecker D, McBeth M, Husmann M, Pelikan N. (2015) Do New Media Support New Policy Narratives? The Social Construction of the US-Mexico Border on YouTube. Policy and Internet 7, 4:  497-525. 

Lybecker D, McBeth M, Kusko E. (2013) Trash or treasure: recycling narratives and reducing political polarization. Environmental Politics 22, 2:  312-332.

Keynote Forum

Catherine Hakim

London School of Economics, UK

Keynote: The male sexual deficit: A social fact of the 21st century – and its many consequences

Time : 10:15-11:00

OMICS International Social Sciences 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Catherine Hakim photo
Biography:

Catherine Hakim is a pioneering social scientist,  Professorial Research Fellow with Civitas, a London think tank, and a regular commentator in the media.   She has worked in the Centre for Policy Studies, London, and the WZB research institute in Berlin.   Her professional experience spans central government, consultancy, and academia.  In the British Ministry of Employment, she initiated research on occupational segregation, the pay gap, and home-based work. As a Senior Research Fellow and Professor in the London School of Economics she developed Preference Theory, and a theory of the social and economic value of Erotic Capital.  She is an internationally recognized expert on women's employment, social and family policy, voluntary childlessness and the male sexual deficit.   Her publications include over 100 papers published in social science journals and edited collections, several textbooks, including Key Issues in Women’s Work and Research Design, books and research monographs. See www.catherinehakim.org

Abstract:

Nationally representative interview surveys of sexual behavior and attitudes proliferated around the globe from 1990 onwards as a result of the AIDS scare, yet are overlooked by sociologists and economists. We review findings from some 30 national sex surveys around the world showing that large and substantively important differences between men and women in the centrality of sexuality, sexual desire, sexual behavior and sexual attitudes persist in the 21st century, long after the contraceptive and sexual revolutions of the 1960s gave women access to recreational sex on the same level as men have enjoyed historically. Women’s lesser sexual motivation and interest means that many heterosexual men experience a shortfall in desired sexual activity, both within and outside long-term relationships. A reversal of the sex ratio to a male surplus among prime age adults, women’s access to economic independence, and other trends suggest that the sexual deficit among men is increasing long term.  The male sexual deficit (or surplus male sexuality) helps to explain sexual harassment, sexual violence, rape, rising demand for commercial sexual services and other behaviors that are almost exclusively male, even in liberal democracies of the Western world.

References:

The New Rules: Economies of Desire, 2nd edition, London: Gibson Square, 2017.

Hakim, C (2015) Supply and Desire: Sexuality and the Sex Industry in the 21st Century, Discussion Paper No. 61, London: Institute of Economic Affairs, August 2015.

Hakim, C. (2012) The New Rules: Internet Dating, Playfairs and Erotic Power, London: Gibson Square.

Hakim, C. (2011) Erotic Capital: The Power of Attraction in the Boardroom and the Bedroom, New York: Basic Books, September 2011.

Kontula, O. (2009) Between Sexual Desire and Reality: The Evolution of Sex in Finlandtrans. M Makinen, Helsinki: Population Research Institute.

Keynote Forum

Ulimiri Somayajulu

Indian Association for Social Sciences and Health, India

Keynote: SDGs and multi sectoral approach

Time : 11:25-12:10

OMICS International Social Sciences 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ulimiri Somayajulu photo
Biography:

Ulimiri V Somayajulu is currently CEO and ED, Sigma Research and Consulting, President, STAR Foundation, President, Indian Association for Study of Population (IASP), and Vice President, Indian Association for Social Sciences and Health.  He is a Statistical Demographer and Social Scientist with more than two and half decades of research experience in social and development sector. He is author of nine edited volumes and author of 115 papers published in journals/edited volumes and presented at international and national conferences/seminars.  Coordinated more than 500 research studies in social and development sector for UN agencies, international NGOs, academic institutes and Indian Government departments.

Abstract:

In 2000, world leaders adopted the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which committed nations to a global partnership to reduce extreme poverty by 2015. The implementation of the MDGs led to progress in terms of income poverty, access to improved sources of water, primary school enrollment, and child mortality but poverty remains a reality for many. Lack of integration across sectors was a major gap noticed that had impact on the achievement of the MDGs. Review of global multi-stakeholder partnerships under the MDG agenda reveal that these partnerships reinforced siloed (sectoral) and ‘projectized’ approach to development problems and solutions. The sectoral approach undermined the potential to address the drivers of systemic change and for scaling impact through a more programmatic approach (World Resource Institute, 2015).

In September 2015, world leaders adopted the 2030 agenda for sustainable development along with 17 goals and 169 targets. Integration of economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development and inter linkages existing within and across the goals is the key feature of this agenda. The SDGs build on the key lesson from the MDGs that sustained systemic change cannot be achieved through single-sector goals and approaches. Hence, implementing the 2030 agenda entails breaking down traditional silos for more cross-sectoral decision-making  and solutions.

The 2030 sustainable development agenda presents unique opportunity for multi stakeholder partnerships for sustainable development so as to leverage cross-sectoral approaches to enhance effectiveness as well as impact. To avail this opportunity, action is needed to strengthen accountability, transparency, coherence, monitoring, reporting, and knowledge sharing through cross-sectoral multi-stakeholder partnerships.

A review of the SDGs indicates that some thematic areas covered by the SDGs are well connected among one another. Existing link between targets and several SDGs gets demonstrated. The links among sectors that are identified include :  education, gender and health nexus, water, energy, food nexus, energy, food security, and poverty eradication nexus, and climate, land, energy, and water nexus.

Interactions between proposed water, energy and food targets

Mapping nexus targets as nodes between goal areas

  • Medicine| Behavioral Studies | Epidemiology | Psychology | Education | Natural Sciences | Nursing | Criminology
Location: Atlantis 1
Speaker

Chair

Donna Lybecker

Idaho State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ulimiri Somayajulu

Indian Association for Social Sciences and Health, India

Session Introduction

Chana Akins

University of Kentucky, USA

Title: Best practices for successful mentoring of today’s graduate students

Time : 12:10-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Chana Akins is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Kentucky. Her research interests focus on how drugs of abuse affect behavior and motivation.  She has published over 45 peer-reviewed papers and has served on the editorial board for the Psychology of Addictive Behaviors and as Associate Editor for Psychology of Women Quarterly and Learning & Behavior. She has held several leadership positions including Inaugural Class of Leadership Institute for Women in Psychology for the American Psychological Association (APA) and President of APA’s Division 6 (Society for Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology).          

Abstract:

In the social sciences and other disciplines, student success can be measured by a number of variables: retention, graduation rate, course completion, etc. Among these variables, there are a number of constants. One of these constants has to do with mentoring. Previous research has revealed a strong correlation between faculty mentorship and graduate student success.  Effective mentoring advances the discipline because these students often begin making significant contributions long before they complete their graduate degrees. Such students are more likely to have productive and distinguished careers that enrich the discipline. However, mentoring graduate students can be time-consuming and oftentimes very challenging.  Effective mentoring requires a commitment to advancing the student’s career and involves developing a professional and interpersonal relationship that facilitates sharing guidance, experience, and expertise.  It also requires continuous re-evaluation of student progress and feedback. The fact that today’s students come from increasingly diverse backgrounds, have different ways of communicating, and are increasingly more technological may add complexity but may also be a source of enrichment. The purpose of this workshop is to engage in a dialog about the best practices for successfully mentoring today’s graduate students including serving as a role model, maintaining professional and ethical standards, providing support and guidance, providing training and oversight of research projects, and providing the framework for students to become independent researchers.  Ultimately, effective mentoring can be transformative for students who are preparing to be colleagues with their mentors as they move to the next phase of professional life.

Debra Mims

Saint Leo University Campus, USA

Title: Paws on parole programs: Inmates’ perceptions and the impact on the community

Time : 13:50-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Mims is a retired Tampa Police Officer.  While at the Tampa Police Department Dr. Mims served on the Mounted Patrol Unit, was a Community Police Officer, Bicycle Patrol Officer, and Under-Cover Officer and was an Elderly Abuse Investigator, Domestic Violence Investigator and a Child Abuse Investigator.   Dr. Mims holds a doctoral degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Criminal Justice from Northcentral University. She is an undergraduate faculty Professor of Criminal Justice at Saint Leo University and also teaches at the Pasco-Hernando State College and Hillsborough Community College Police Academies. Dr. Mims is a certified firearms instructor, CPR and Basic Life Support instructor and holds a private investigators and recovery agent license.  She professionally trains and shows dogs in obedience, agility, freestyle, tricks and therapy and owns five border collies and three papillions.

Abstract:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of prison inmates participating in Paws on Parole program.  The Paws on Parole program involves incarcerated inmates training local humane shelter canines’ obedience training techniques using the canine good citizen model during an 8 week program.  Using secondary data from self-report questionnaires completed by the inmates, this study sought to explore how the inmates felt before and after their exposure to the Paws on Parole program. Specifically, this research seeks to better understand how the Paws on Parole program is perceived as helpful by the inmates in helping them to cope with prison life and their overall personal well-being. Once the dogs have been trained they are distributed into the community in a variety of modalities; from companion dogs, to therapy and service dogs.  For years, animals have been used with great benefit in the treatment of the aged and the terminally ill and as service dogs to the infirmed. Animal assisted therapy is thought to be a useful tool for children with mental and physical difficulties; helping to promote a general emotional well-being, aiding in fine motor skills and balance and assisting with both educational and motivational purposes by encouraging long or short-term memory, increasing vocabulary and improving a person’s interaction and involvements with others.   Animal therapy is also making strides in the treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).   Animal Assisted Therapy in the treatment of PTSD patients has seen significant results.

Prisons and juvenile detention centers

References:

Aaron, M. (2012). The pathways of problematic sexual behavior: A literature review of factors affecting adult sexual behavior in survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, 19(3), 199–21. doi:10.1080/10720162.2012.690678

Abbe, A., & Brandon, S. (2014). Building and maintaining rapport in investigative interviews. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal, 15(3), 207-220. doi:10.1080/15614263.2013.827835

Alaggia, R. (2010). An ecological analysis of child sexual abuse disclosure: Considerations for child and adolescents mental health. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 19(1), 32-39. Retrieved from http://www.cacap-acpea.org/en/cacap/Journal_p828.html

American Pet Products Association. (2012). 2011/2012 national pet owners survey. Greenwich, CT: Author.

American Psychiatric Association. (2014). Child sexual abuse what parents should know. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families /resources/child-sexual-abuse.aspx

American Veterinary Medical Association. (2012). U.S. pet ownership & demographics sourcebook. Schaumburg, IL: Author.

Speaker
Biography:

Waddell is a Professor and Associate Chair of the Undergraduate Social Work Department. She has been a member of the Saint Leo University (SLU) Community since August 2010. She received the bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida in Sociology, the Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Social Work from Florida State University. She previously worked as a medical social worker and taught an interdisciplinary family health course with Shands Hospital and the University of Florida in Gainesville for a combined 19 years of service. Currently Dr. Waddell has taught all of the undergraduate social work courses offered at SLU. Her research interests include interdisciplinary collaborations on social justice topics to include community health, humane education, and veterinary social work topics of study. She enjoys her family which includes two daughters, Sarah and Maggie, one grandson, Richard, three dogs, and a pot belly pig.

Abstract:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of prison inmates participating in Paws on Parole program.  The Paws on Parole program involves incarcerated inmates training local humane shelter canines’ obedience training techniques using the canine good citizen model during an 8 week program.  Using secondary data from self-report questionnaires completed by the inmates, this study sought to explore how the inmates felt before and after their exposure to the Paws on Parole program. Specifically, this research seeks to better understand how the Paws on Parole program is perceived as helpful by the inmates in helping them to cope with prison life and their overall personal well-being. Once the dogs have been trained they are distributed into the community in a variety of modalities; from companion dogs, to therapy and service dogs.  For years, animals have been used with great benefit in the treatment of the aged and the terminally ill and as service dogs to the infirmed. Animal assisted therapy is thought to be a useful tool for children with mental and physical difficulties; helping to promote a general emotional well-being, aiding in fine motor skills and balance and assisting with both educational and motivational purposes by encouraging long or short-term memory, increasing vocabulary and improving a person’s interaction and involvements with others.   Animal therapy is also making strides in the treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).   Animal Assisted Therapy in the treatment of PTSD patients has seen significant results.

Prisons and juvenile detention centers

References:

Aaron, M. (2012). The pathways of problematic sexual behavior: A literature review of factors affecting adult sexual behavior in survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, 19(3), 199–21. doi:10.1080/10720162.2012.690678

Abbe, A., & Brandon, S. (2014). Building and maintaining rapport in investigative interviews. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal, 15(3), 207-220. doi:10.1080/15614263.2013.827835

Alaggia, R. (2010). An ecological analysis of child sexual abuse disclosure: Considerations for child and adolescents mental health. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 19(1), 32-39. Retrieved from http://www.cacap-acpea.org/en/cacap/Journal_p828.html

American Pet Products Association. (2012). 2011/2012 national pet owners survey. Greenwich, CT: Author.

American Psychiatric Association. (2014). Child sexual abuse what parents should know. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families /resources/child-sexual-abuse.aspx

American Veterinary Medical Association. (2012). U.S. pet ownership & demographics sourcebook. Schaumburg, IL: Author.

Kristina Lybecker

Colorado College, USA

Title: Sustainable health: The role of pharmaceutical patents

Time : 14:50-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Kristina M Lybecker is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics and Business at Colorado College in Colorado Springs, CO.  She received her Ph.D. in Economics in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley.  Kristina’s research analyses the difficulties of strengthening intellectual property rights protection in developing countries, specifically in the context of the pharmaceutical and environmental technology industries. Recent publications have also addressed alternatives to the existing patent system, the balance between pharmaceutical patent protection and access to essential medicines, and the role of international trade agreements in incentivizing innovation.   In 2016 she was awarded the Thomas Edison Innovation Fellowship by the Centre for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) at George Mason University School of Law.  She has also worked with US Food and Drug Administration, Reconnaissance International, PhRMA, the National Peace Foundation, the OECD, the Fraser Institute, and the World Bank, on issues of innovation, international trade, and corruption.   

Abstract:

As the world becomes smaller through technological advances and easier global travel, it is increasingly apparent that diseases and pandemics no longer occur in isolated pockets of distant nations, but that the health of all citizens of the world is intricately linked.  Safeguarding public health is a global endeavour and a significant challenge.  The emergence of new viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria, as well as the growing global burden of non-communicable diseases, highlight the importance of maintaining a medical arsenal that keeps pace.  This paper focuses on the difficulties surrounding sustainable global health and the role of pharmaceutical patents in developing new treatments and cures to combat current challenges.

      

Complex, Risky and Expensive

References:

Felkey, A.J. and K.M. Lybecker (2017) “ Do Restrictions Beget Responsibility?  The Case of U.S. Abortion Legislation” (2017) The American Economist, forthcoming.

Lybecker, K.M. (2016)  “The Biologics Revolution”, chapter 1 in “Intellectual Property Rights and the Promotion of Biologics, Medical Devices and Trade in Pharmaceuticals”, Fraser Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Lybecker, K.M. (2016)  “Illicit Trade in Counterfeit Medicines”, chapter 4, in OECD Reviews of Risk Management Policies:  Illicit Trade Converging Criminal Networks, OECD Publishing, 79-122.

Lybecker, K.M. (2016) “Intellectual Property Protection for Biologics: Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Trade Agreement Fails to Deliver”, Journal of Commercial Biotechnology, 22(1): 42-48.

Johnson, D.N.J., K.M. Lybecker, D. Nadar and A. Schultheis (2016) “Should I Buy Here, or Keep Driving?  The Effect of Geographic Market Density on Retail Gas prices” Journal of Business, 01(02): 12-20

 

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Gary Young is Director of the Northeastern University Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Research, as well as Professor of Strategic Management and Healthcare Systems, Northeastern University.  His research generally covers management, legal, and policy issues affecting the delivery of healthcare services.  Much of his recent research focuses on measuring and evaluating the performance of healthcare providers, particularly for quality of care, and the potential for using financial incentives to improve providers’ performance on quality metrics. Dr. Young has received research funding from both government agencies and private foundations, including the National Science Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  He has published in such journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Health Affairs, Medical Care, Journal of Health Economics, and Academy of Management Journal.

Abstract:

This study investigated whether integration of hospitals and physicians is associated with better care for patients with cardiac conditions.  A dramatic change in the U.S. hospital industry is the integration of hospital and physicians through hospital acquisition of physician practices. Yet, little evidence exists regarding whether this form of integration leads to better quality of care.  The study was conducted as an observational investigation and was based on a new theoretical model that integrated concepts from economics, organizational behaviour, and medical sociology.  The study sample comprised over 300 hospitals in the State of California. The time frame for the study was 2010 to 2013.  The key performance measures were hospitals’ degree of compliance with performance criteria set out by the federal government for managing patients with cardiac conditions.   These criteria relate to the types of clinical tests and medications that cardiac patients should receive but hospital compliance requires the cooperation of physicians.   Data for these measures were obtained from a federal web site that presents performance scores for U.S. hospitals.  The key independent variable was the percentage of cardiologists that a hospital employs (versus cardiologists who are affiliated but not employed by the hospital). Data for this measure was obtained from the State of California which requires hospitals to report financial and operation data each year including numbers of employed physicians.  Other characteristics of hospitals (e.g., information technology for cardiac care, volume of cardiac patients) were also evaluated as possible complements or substitutes for physician employment by hospitals.  Additional sources of data included the American Hospital Association and the U.S. Census.  Empirical models were estimated with generalized estimating equations (GEE).  Findings suggest that physician employment is positively associated with better hospital performance for cardiac care.  However, findings also suggest that information technology is a substitute for physician employment.

References:

Alexander, J.A. & Young, G.J. 2016. Health Professionals and Organizations – Moving toward True Symbiosis. In Hoff, T.J., Sutcliffe, K.M, & Young, G.J. (Eds.), The HealthCare Professional Workforce: Understanding Human Capital in a Changing Industry. New York, New York:  Oxford University Press.

Baker, L.C., Bundorf, M. K., & Kessler, D.P., 2014. Vertical integration: Hospital ownership of physician practices is associated with higher prices and spending. Health Affairs, 33(5): 756-763.

Forbes, S.J. & Lederman, M., 2009. Adaptation and vertical integration in the airline industry. The American Economic Review, 99(5): 1831-1849.

Friedberg, M.W., Chen, P.G., White, C., Jung, O., Raaen, L., Hirschman, S., Hach, E., Stevens, C., Ginsburg, P.B., Casalino, L.P., Tutty, M., Vargo, C., Lipinski, L.  2015. Effects of Health Care Payment Models on Physician Practice in the United States. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation.

Young, G. J., Nyaga, G. N., & Zepeda, D., 2016. Hospital employment of physicians and supply chain performance: An empirical investigation. Health Care Management Review, 41(3): 244-255.

Jaffe Eliezer

Haifa University, Israel

Title: Wisdom of the crowd in saving lives

Time : 16:40-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Eli Jaffe is the Director of Training, PR, Volunteer Activities, Marketing and International Relations Division, of the Israeli national EMS organization Magen David Adom. He has published books and articles and is an authority in the fields of emergency medicine and medical management, and is also one of the leading researchers in Israel in the field of volunteers and the prevention of PTSD. Dr. Jaffe is a well-known lecturer in the Israeli universities.

Abstract:

How can EMS (Emergency Medical Services) be anywhere at any time? In medical emergencies, time is crucial, the ideal situation is to have ambulances right next to the event. Due to limitations, this ideal situation cannot be reached. Recruiting available resources such as trained personnel in the society and social media that are available to save lives. The actions that can be taken to exploit the wisdom of the crowd in saving lives even before the ambulance arrives.

“Life Guardians”- Project. Harnessing resources available in the population who have medical training. Doctors, nurses, paramedics, and first aid providers who do not belong to MDA (Magen David Adom- Israel National EMS). The advantages are: Resources available in the community. Power multiplier, availability to react quickly and everywhere in collaboration even without belonging to the organization. Base of Volunteers & Standby Medics. All you need is medical training, an application, and basic equipment.

Social Media: Today, drivers use apps such as "Waze" when they drive. They report road accidents. The advantage is clear - a quick and precise location on long roads. Saving valuable time in locating an accident and thus causing quick care which will inevitably save lives.

Designated apps such as "MyMDA". In every emergency dispatch in the world, the dispatchers are blind. They can talk and hear, but they can’t see. This is the first time in the world that the dispatchers can see the scene before the ambulance arrives. MyMDA can relay users’ location, medical info and video from scene to dispatchers

Speaker
Biography:

Angie holds professional qualifications as a Registered Integrated Marketing Communicator of Nigeria with the Certified Marketing Communications Institute of Nigeria (CMCIN) and an Associate Member of the Advertising Practitioners’ Council of Nigeria (APCON). She served as a cub reporter and interviewer with the print media organization known as New Nigeria Newspaper (NNN) Ltd in 2004; she also worked with the broadcast media organization known as Africa Independent Television (AIT), in 2008, where she was involved in preparing, proofreading and editing news reports for on-air transmission. Angie possesses the gift of gab with good writing and editing skills. Some of the undergraduate courses taught include speech communication & rhetoric, broadcast station management & programming, foundation of broadcasting, announcing & presentation, et cetera. She is an up-and-coming whiz kid in the field of Health Communication whose on-going Ph.D. research focuses on the mass media and safe motherhood.

Abstract:

The high illiteracy level in most rural communities of the country is not representative of positive impacts information and communication technologies (ICTs) have had on Nigerian rural agriculture in terms of productivity, growth and development. The study investigated adoption of ICT among rural farming dwellers in Iseyin Local Government Area of Oyo state, Nigeria, based on gender analysis. A well-structured interview schedule was employed to elicit quantitative information from 60 male and 60 female rural farming dwellers from Serafu, Ado-awaye and Osoogun in Iseyin Local Government Areas, using the two stage random sampling procedure. Results showed that 55% of the male respondents and 46.7% of the female respondents adopted various selected ICT in general. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) at <0.05 level of significance resulted that a significant difference exists in the adoption of the ICTs of both male and female respondents (F=4.198). The findings revealed that at <0.05 level of significance, significant difference existed in the level of income of the male and female respondents (F= 4.079). Therefore, in order to bridge the gender division in the level of adoption of ICTs, among rural dwellers, it was recommended that various ICTs should be made available for rural dwellers at subsidized rate because larger percentage of them know the importance and benefit of ICTs but lack the financial capacity to acquire them. The government should formulate policy that will enhance continuous utilization of ICTs for rural activities and for development of rural livelihood, in Nigeria.

References:

Gbenga, F.K and Deji, O. F. (2015) Gender analysis of technologies utilization among small scale oil palm fruits processors in Ondo state, Nigeria. Acta Agronomica. 64:1.

2. Olatade, K. O., Olugbire, O. O., Adepoju, A. O, Aremu, F. J. and Oyedele, P. B. (2016). How do farmers’ characteristics affect their willingness to adopt agricultural innovation? The case of bio-fortified Cassava in Oyo state, Nigeria. International Journal of Science and Technology. 5: 9-15.           

3. Igbinoba, O. A. et al. (2016). New media and HIV/AIDS awareness among married women. Communication Review, 7:3, Nigeria: The Department of Mass Communication, University of Lagos. Pp 119-136.

4. Olugbire, O. O., Aremu, F. J., Opute, O. H., Ojedokun, C. A., Ayomide, A. A., and Oguntoye, T. O. (2016). Contribution of fuel wood marketing to sustainable livelihood in Oyo state, Nigeria. Russian Journal of Agriculture and Socio Economic Sciences. 3: 51-57.

5. Kassali, R., Aremu, F. J., and Shittu, B. A. (2015). An economic analysis of watermelon marketing in Oyo state, Nigeria. Journal of Production, Agriculture and Technology. 11: 43-52

6. Baruwa, O. I., Kassali, R., and Aremu, F. J. (2015). Adoption of improved maize varieties among farming households in Osun state, Nigeria. Journal of Production, Agriculture and Technology. 11:1-9

7. Ogunsola, G. O., Olugbire, O. O., Oyekale and Aremu, F. J. (2015). Understanding perception and adaptation to climate change among cocoa farmers in tropical Condition (2015). Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management 8 (Suppl.1): 816-825. Doi:http://bx.doi.org/10.4314/ejesm.v8i1.9S

8. Olugbire, O. O., Aremu, F. J., Oyedele, P. B., and Ogedengbe, T. A. (2015). Analysis of profitability and operational efficiency of shea butter marketing: Empirical evidence from Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria. Journal of Sciences and Multidisciplinary Research 7: 40 – 46.

9. Olugbire, O. O., Adetunji, M. O., Aremu, F. J., and Iyiola, O. (2015) Poverty and Development among Rural Farmers: Implication on Nigeria’s Economy. A research article presented at the 3rd National Workshop cum Conference of Sustainable Livelihoods Development Network for Africa (SLIDEN) at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho, Nigeria.

10. Deji O. F. (2013). Gender analysis of fish farming technologies adoption by farmers in Ondo state. Scientific Research Essays 8 (26): 1219-1225